Week 2 NaNoWriMo Survival

Week 2 NaNoWriMo Survival
November 11, 2016 9 Comments Writing Advice Stephanie Ayers

nanowrimo-survival-1This is the week when many writers lose heart. The first week held much motivation. The second week crawls by, and you growl in disgust as your plans run off with your outline and wave goodbye from your office window.

Do not lost heart. You’ve already established a good pace in writing the story once you set aside all those distractions I mentioned in last week’s post. Because week 2 is such a drudgery, let’s have a little fun, and as a procrastination expert, I’ll share some tips on how to wait until the last minute to fulfill your NaNoWriMo goals. Procrastination is the very definition of NaNo Week 2.

  1. Find other things to do. Anything will do, from nursing your sick cat, to playing around on Photoshop, or even cleaning your house. Anything that gets you away from the page.
  2. Facebook. All day, every day, on your phone, on your computer, while you’re driving (really, I’m kidding. Please don’t Facebook and drive), at the grocery store, at your kid’s soccer game. Any place you have “free” time to write is when you should be on Facebook (or Twitter).
  3. Plan lunch and dinner dates.
  4. Catch up on all those DVR shows you’ve been missing. Tell yourself it’s story research to lessen the guilt.
  5. pomella / PixabayNap, and not like a cat either.
  6. Cheer your WriMo friends on from the safe sidelines of your monitor. Facebook is the best place for this. Bonus: You can celebrate their achievements just as if you did it yourself.
  7. Join in a heated debate about red coffee cups and Christianity. This is guaranteed to fill most of your day, and render a good purging from your friends list.
  8. Repeat step 2. You haven’t had enough time on Facebook yet. Follow that up with a good scrolling and retweeting of your Twitter timeline. Spam a few people with Direct Messages just to get their attention away from their own NaNo projects to talk to you.
  9. Develop a sudden interest in returning to college. Research immaterial things, and start planning an unrealistic future. Wait. You already did that when you signed up for NaNoWriMo.
  10. And the number one way to procrastinate on your NaNoWriMo project is to create a writing community like this one, and spend way too much time focusing on it.

Honestly, aren’t you glad I chose #10? After all, there will always be another NaNoWriMo next year (three if you count April and June), but this project is what I really dream about.

At the end of the month, whether you meet that 50,000 word count goal or not, Our Write Side will still be here, your book will be that much closer to being complete, and I’ll still procrastinate and cheer you on from the sidelines.

Life is short. Enjoy it. Happy writing!

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Stephanie Ayers A published author with a knack for twisted tales, Stephanie Ayers is the Executive Creative Director of OWS Ink, LLC, a community for writers and readers alike. She loves a good thriller, fairies, things that go bump in the night, and sappy stories. When she is not writing, she can be found in Creative Cloud designing book covers and promotional graphics for authors.
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  1. 9 Comments

    Tessa

    I am already procrastinating with other priorities to blogs I promised researched blog posts for. That put a crimp in my writing. I am at 5100 words so far. Long way to catch up.

    Reply
    1. 9 Comments

      Stephanie Ayers

      you aren’t alone. I think you actually have more words than I do, LOL. We are writing, that’s all that matters.

      Reply
      1. 9 Comments

        Tessa

        Good reply. And this is the most I have done over the years so that is another plus.

        Reply
        1. 9 Comments

          Stephanie Ayers

          A definite plus. I hope you can find inspiration here again soon too. I miss your stories.

          Reply
          1. 9 Comments

            Tessa

            Thank you! I have been doing mainly haikus since I have been busy writing articles/blog posts for International Bipolar Foundation — IBPF.org — and of course NANO.

          2. 9 Comments

            Stephanie Ayers

            Congratulations! We’d love to have you share your writing process for articles and how you landed this regular writing gig advice when you have time. I’m thrilled for you!

          3. 9 Comments

            Tessa

            Why thank you! I will have to think about that process for a bit. I trying to get another one now. Still haven’t heard. Had to send an article for her to decide. I will try to come up with something. It’s a blog post as they call it, but to me it is an article. Still requires research like an article would right?

          4. 9 Comments

            Stephanie Ayers

            it’s an article. We call our writers columnists, which is justly deserved.

          5. 9 Comments

            Tessa

            I am an unpaid columnist then. I volunteer my writing abilities.

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