Tag Archives: worldbuilding

The World as a Character

Sometimes you read a book or see a movie where the setting, be it a house or a climate, is integral to the story. Any other choice would change the feel of the book, losing impact and possibly the reader. Lost Horizon by James Hilton is

Worldbuilding: Creating a Specific Mood

Remember Mood Rings?  Back in the 70’s we were entranced with the thermal sensitive stone set in a simple gold or silver ring (most of which turned your finger green). According to the color chart, when worn on the finger, the stone reacted to body

Worldbuilding- It’s Not Just For Fantasy

Every time we sit down to write fiction, we are worldbuilding.  The term often brings the Science Fiction/Fantasy genre to mind but I know that in my genre, Romantic Suspense, I create worlds also. In my current book, SHARK BAIT, I created Belton Bay.  It’s

Worldbuilding: For Specific Genres

As I said this past week, all novelists are worldbuilders. It is our job to give the reader a comprehensive picture of the character and the influences which affect his/her environment. You don’t have to infodump and overwhelm the reader with detail. They just need

How to Avoid the Curse of Overwriting

Oh, boy, talk about a tough subject! Just when I think my writing has been trimmed down to the bare minimum, my critiquers/beta readers/editors point out some unnecessary adverb, preposition, or even sentence. Overwriting is the enemy that all writers will be battling for the

Viewing Editing as an Opportunity for World-building

I used to hate the thought of editing. In my younger years as a writer, I naively believed my work was perfect in its first form and I churned out new content rather than retouching something preexisting. I have, thankfully, grown and matured as a

Basics of World Building

World building. Every writer has heard that phrase and you know it’s important, but what does it mean exactly? World building is more than just creating the setting, it means building up the universe your story takes place in. This involves everything from descriptions of

Worldbuilding: An Intro

Think back. Your first worldbuilding came in the form of daydreams.  Places you would go, people you might meet, all from your imagination.  I later played Dungeons and Dragons, a game all about fantasy and worldbuilding.  As a wrangler of words I am aware that

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