Little Red Riding Hood

For authors, by authors, one word at a time

Little Red Riding Hood

January 24, 2013 Master Class Writing 21

Morphine makes me weightless, airborne. Codeine makes me heavy, grounded. When I don my little red riding cape, it makes me invincible, immortal.

I’m a little Red, hopping down the bunny trail. Over the river, through the woods, to the house made of gingerbread I go. Hansel and Gretel got nothing on me.

Morphine makes me weightless, airborne. Codeine makes me heavy, grounded. When I don my little red riding cape, it makes me victorious, indestructible.

I’m a little Red, hopping down the bunny trail, a basket for my grandmother in hand. Along came a spider and sat down beside her, but I scared that old wolf away.

Morphine makes me weightless, airborne. Codeine makes me heavy, grounded. When I don my little red riding cape, it makes me powerful, omnipotent.

“What small, beady eyes you have,” said the spider to the fly. “I can see you just fine,” was the fly’s reply. “Your snout is filled with sharp, little teeth,” said Red to the wolf, “but you… (Thump!) won’t… (Whack!) eat… (Thunk!) me! (Thwat!)”

Morphine makes me weightless, airborne. Codeine makes me heavy, grounded. When I don my little red riding cape, it makes me invisible, indescribable.

“The blood on the walls doesn’t match the grandmother,” Red overheard.
“Then it must be the huntsman. His wolfs-head hat was found under the bed, the snout chopped in two.”
“No, no, I’m merely nicked,” Red’s grandmother said. “She came in and just didn’t understand that he wasn’t hurting me. It…It was just a…game. She grabbed his axe and started swinging.”

Morphine makes me weightless, airborne. Codeine makes me heavy, grounded. When I don my little red riding cape, it makes me visceral, unaccountable.

“It’s the cape. Every time she puts it on, something changes. It’s like she’s not herself.” Grandmother said to the man in black.

Morphine makes me weightless, airborne. Codeine makes me heavy, grounded. When I don my little red riding cape, it makes me omnipresent, neither here nor there.

Peter, Peter, red cape eater, had a wife and couldn’t keep her. So he put her in a prison cell and there he kept her very well.

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This week’s Master Class, hosted by Eric Storch of Sinistral Scribblings, was brought to you by Roxanne from Unintentionally Brilliant. She chose Kelle Groom’s book I Wore the Ocean in the Shape of a Girl whose opening line is: Morphine makes me weightless, airborne.

I’m also linking this up with #FridayFlash.

I always want and welcome  honest feedback. Please share your thoughts in a comment.

Thanks for stopping in!

 

21 Responses

  1. Tessa says:

    Morphine gives me giant hives LOL! I like your version better. 🙂

  2. 2old2tap says:

    I love this! The rambling yet directed incoherence. It almost made me high reading it.

  3. Eric Storch says:

    Wow. Murder most foul. Awesome, SAM!

  4. stankmeaner says:

    Bam! Have I mentioned that I really love your dark side? This was fantastic, the dips into her crazy brain and the outlying conversations, very very well done!

    • SAM says:

      Thanks. I think you mentioned it once before but I dont think I have been writing as much of my dark stuff lately. Someone else told me I found my voice writing the dark stuff. I have to admit that I always like my dark stories more than others.

  5. Carrie says:

    That was a trip SAM. Creepy fairy tale retold 🙂

  6. Chelle says:

    This is, by far, my favorite story you’ve written! OMG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! What a fun ride through your dark side! 🙂

  7. steph says:

    So unique. I love it. So many fairytales are gruesome. I love where you went with it.

  8. t says:

    Creepy. Creepy good!

  9. angelaamman says:

    Really wonderful job. It’s disorienting, which I imagine is what it’s like in her head.

  10. Marian says:

    i think i’ll read this one to my kids and see what they think of it 🙂

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